The Irish Times: Caoilinn Hughes take first and third places judged by Kevin Barry

The author Kevin Barry chose not one but two of Caoilinn Hughes’ stories as his prizewinners in this year’s Moth Short Story Prize, which he judged anonymously. Psychobabble takes first prize, and is, according to Barry, “a story that walks a difficult road in terms of its tone or note – it’s a dark situation dealt with not lightly but with an effervescence in the line, in the sentence-making, and it’s this vivacity that elevates the piece above the rest. It’s both poignant and very funny, emotional yet sardonic. The writer has great control.”

via Debut novelist Caoilinn Hughes comes first (and third!) in The Moth Short Story Prize

Follow the links to read Kevin Barry’s comments in full and the three prizewinning stories in The Irish Times online.

The O. Henry Prize Stories 2018 | PenguinRandomHouse.com

ABOUT THE O. HENRY PRIZE STORIES 2018
The O. Henry Prize Stories 2018 contains twenty prize-winning stories chosen from thousands published in literary magazines over the previous year. The winning stories come from a mix of established writers and emerging voices, and are uniformly breathtaking.

via The O. Henry Prize Stories 2018 | PenguinRandomHouse.com

nss3 back cover detailLooks like the O. Henry Prize anthology includes a new short story by Jo Lloyd, whose story “Work” took the Willesden Herald short story competition first prize in 2009, as judged by Rana Dasgupta. You can read it in New Short Stories 3. The mesmerising opening line from “Work” is also featured on the back cover of the book (see image).

Amity and Sorrow by Peggy Riley – Pandora’s Looking-Glass

“The first novel from Kent-based American author, Peggy Riley, Amity and Sorrow is a mesmerising exploration of the tension between the familiar and the unknown, of extremes of faith and the lengths to which people can be caught up in the fantasies of others.”

via The Red Dirt Road as a dark Wizard of Oz: Amity and Sorrow by Peggy Riley – Pandora’s Looking-Glass

Peggy Riley’s poetic short story “Pearl” was included in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 4.

Spelk: The Burnt Moth by Gerard McKeown

If that evocative and insightful flash struck home, you can read more by Gerard McKeown, his prizewinning 2017 short story “A History of Fire” in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 10.

David Means in conversation with Sinéad Gleeson

David Means reading and interview in the Firkin Crane as part of the Cork International Short Story Festival 2017, moderated by Sinéad Gleeson

Link: Cork International Short Story Festival, September 12-15 2018

Introduction 00:00 – 01:13
Reading 01:13 – 21:40
Discussion 21:40 – 51:22

You can read the rest of “Fistfight, Sacramento, August 1950” by David Means online here in Harper’s magazine.

David Means was the judge for our short story competition in 2013. You can read the prizewinning stories in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 7.

Granta | Sheila Heti and Tao Lin discuss writing

A conversation about their experiences writing books under contract and dealing with editors, agents etc. Tao Lin’s story “Sasquatch” was short-listed for the Willesden Herald prize in our first year (2005/6).

Read the RTÉ Guide/Penguin Ireland Short Story Competition winner

The winner of this year’s RTÉ Guide/Penguin Ireland Short Story Competition is The Rain Falls Differently Over There by Niall McArdle, a meditation on loss, reconnection and the power of memory.

“There’s lots needs sorting out now, said Siobhán back in the peace of the house. The last of the funeral crowd had left. …”

Link: Read the RTÉ Guide/Penguin Ireland Short Story Competition winner