New Yorker: Lore Segal reads “Dandelion” (March 2019)

A lyrical childhood memory piece of nature and family. It is well-read in the author’s beautiful accent, so evocative of the few treasured remnants of the Kindertransport children who made it to London, in this case from Vienna. (Ref. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lore_Segal). Other recent contributors to The Writer’s Voice podcast series include Sally Rooney and Yiyun Li. Introduced by the New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman.

You can also read the story, for the time being, online. It begins:

“That Henry James, when he got old, rewrote his early work was my excuse for revisiting, at ninety, a story I had written in my twenties. I was ten years old when I had to leave Austria, so the day with my father in the Alps must have taken place on our last family holiday, the previous August.” (Lore Segal)

NPR Interview: David Means on his fifth short story collection

“The reader does most of the work. The reader does all of the imagining. You’re just giving them a set of instructions on how to hear and see something.” (David Means)

Thanks to Bristol Prize on Twitter for this link to David Means interview on NPR with Audie Cornish.

BBC Radio 3: A subjunctive story by Toby Litt

“Ian McMillan gets into the subjunctive mood with brand new writing from Toby Litt, a new poetry commission from Holly Pester, on the subjunctive in welsh with Menna Elfyn and Rob Drummond explains why the subjunctive is dying out amongst the young…” (The Verb, BBC Radio 3, 1 Feb. 2019)

Bustle: “10 storytelling podcasts you need to listen to”

“Whether you’re hitting the road, heading to the gym, or just trying to brighten up your daily commute, here are 10 storytelling podcasts you’ll love listening to if you love short stories. Featuring fiction and non-fiction narratives alike, these shows will scratch that narrative itch when reading a book just isn’t an option.” (Sadie Trombetta, Bustle.com)

Orhan Pamuk reads and discusses a J. L. Borges short story

Podcast: Nobel laureate novelist Orhan Pamuk joins the fiction editor of The New Yorker, Deborah Treisman, to read and discuss “Ibn Hakkan Al-Bokhari, Dead in his Labyrinth,” by Jorge Luis Borges, from a 1970 issue of the magazine.

Granta: “The Sweet Sop” by Ingrid Persaud |BBC NSSA 2018 winner

In partnership with Commonwealth Writers, Granta publishes the regional winners of the 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Ingrid Persaud’s ‘The Sweet Sop’ is the winning entry from the Caribbean, and the overall winner of the 2017 prize.

After taking the Commonwealth Prize for “winning entry from the Caribbean” in 2017, Ingrid Persaud’s story The Sweet Sop has just been awarded the BBC National Short Story award 2018, a whopping £15,000 prize.

You can read the story by following the link to Granta from June 2017 and/or you can also follow links from the BBC’s NSSA 2018 winner announcement page to listen to a reading of “The Sweet Sop” as well as the other short-listed stories. You might question how the same story can win prizes in two competitions in successive years but never mind that, let’s just say congratulations to Ingrid and “More power to her elbow.”

Read: The Sweet Sop | Ingrid Persaud | Granta Magazine

Listen: BBC National Short Story Award 2018 stories

See if you can choose the winning story, which will get £15,000 for its author. Here’s more about the short-listed stories and the competition (BBC). Men, knock before entering.