The New Yorker: “Are You Experienced?” by David Means

David Means

‘Means is the author of the novel “Hystopia” and five story collections, including “The Spot” and “Instructions for a Funeral,” which was published earlier this year.”‘

From the point of view of this blog: David Means was the judge for the 2013 Willesden Herald international short story competition, awarding the prize mug to a story by Danielle McLaughlin, which you can read in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 7.

BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University 2019: “The Invisible” by Jo Lloyd

“WELSH WRITER JO LLOYD WINS THE 2019 BBC NATIONAL SHORT STORY AWARD WITH ‘TIMELESS’ AND ‘DEEPLY TENDER’ STORY INFLUENCED BY BREXIT, SOCIAL DIVISION AND FOLKLORE” (BBC Radio 4)

“Welsh writer Jo Lloyd has won the fourteenth BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University 2019 (NSSA) for ‘The Invisible’, a distinctive and compellingly original story. Inspired by the life of an 18th Century woman from Carnarvonshire called Martha who claimed to be friends with an invisible family living in an invisible mansion, Lloyd discovered her story by chance in the online Dictionary of Welsh Biography. Set in a close-knit community, the story is both timeless and universal, and resonates profoundly in an age where fear of outsiders and social division is rife.”

Listen: Aimee-Ffion Edwards reads “Jo Lloyd’s hypnotic tale about the fantasies people embrace to make life bearable” The Invisible by Jo Lloyd.

Read: “Welsh writer takes £15,000 prize for The Invisible, based on a real 18th-century woman who spread tales in her village” Guardian report including the text of the short story.

Interview: Jo Lloyd on Winning the 2019 BBC National Short Story Award (Wasafiri)

This news continues a series of successes this year by previous Willesden international short story prize winners. Jo Lloyd won the Willesden in 2009 with her story “Work”, which you can read in New Short Stories 3.

New Yorker: Louise Erdrich reads her short story “The Stone”

DonErdrich at the 2015 National Book Festival.‘t forget the new Twitter version provides a facility to “bookmark” tweets for later. This can help if you haven’t got time to read just now or have used up all your “free views” till next month. Direct link to text and reading: The Stone by Louise Erdrich.

Photo: “Author Louise Erdrich reading at the 2015 National Book Festival. Erdrich won the 2012 National Book Award for Fiction for her novel The Round House.” (Wikipedia)

The New Yorker: “She Said He Said” by Hanif Kureishi

Text and reading by the author in The New Yorker online (limit on free access applies)

“Hanif Kureishi wrote the screenplays for My Beautiful Laundrette and Le Week-End, among other films. He has published eight novels, including, most recently, The Nothing.

“Second Best” by DH Lawrence (audio)

“A disturbing and powerful story about growing up and coming to terms with life’s realities. Read by Carolyn Pickles. Produced by Simon Richardson.” (BBC Sounds, Summer Stories)

A typical (and typically wonderful) Lawrence story linking human desire to the relentless struggle, conflict and pathos of animals in nature. A powerful but deathly joy found in embracing the second best available mate. Listen

The New Yorker Summer Fiction Issue 2019

The flagship annual summer feast of fiction that keeps readers and writers delighted and hopeful respectively. See This Week In Fiction for many more short stories, interviews and readings.